I
B
N
MENU
British-Nigerian artist living in the United Kingdom
CBE.
E
A
R
H
O
A
I
K
Y
RA
s
N
examination of such ideas as —
Yinka Shonibare known for his
produced by means of a
relations
in often-ironic
A signature element of his work is his use of so-called
A signature element of his work is his
wax-printed fabric,
Dutch
wax-printed
A signature element of his work is his use of so-called Dutch wax-printed fabric, produced by means of a batiklike technique.
produced by means
of a
fabric,
technique.
batiklike
He has these fabrics made up into European 18th-century dresses, covering sculptures of alien figures or stretched onto canvases and thickly painted over.
films,
and installations
paintings,
drawings,
colonialism,
power
and
authenticity,
identity,
sculptures,
photographs,
to be made complex and difficult to read
headless, life-size
meticulously positioned and dressed in
vibrant wax cloth patterns in order for
headless,
Shonibare is well known for creating
vibrant wax cloth patterns
meticulously
sculptural figures
life-size
vibrant wax cloth
positioned and dressed in
Shonibare is well known for creating headless, life-size sculptural figures meticulously positioned and dressed in vibrant wax cloth patterns in order for history and racial identity to be made complex and difficult to read
in order for
history and racial
identity
patterns
to be made complex and difficult to read
headless, life-size
meticulously positioned and dressed in
vibrant wax cloth patterns in order for
meticulously
sculptural figures
life-size
headless,
Shonibare is well known for creating
vibrant wax cloth patterns
positioned and dressed in
in order for
history and racial
identity
And Cultural
Hybridity
Colonialism
Influenced both by the aesthetics of Romanticism in Europe and African textiles, this interplay between historical European and African visuals further creates a complex dialogue around the politics of colonialism and post-colonialism.
Being British-born, growing up in Lagos work has been heavily influenced by his own past, exploring ideas of cross-cultural heritage and the creation of a hybrid identity.
Through sculptures, artist Yinka Shonibare CBE considers
effects on modern conceptions of identity
of identity
and it's lasting
of colonialism
and it's
lasting
effects on modern conceptions
Through sculptures, artist Yinka Shonibare CBE
Through sculptures, artist Yinka Shonibare CBE considers the grasp of colonialism and its lasting effects on modern conceptions of identity
the grasp
considers
Shonibare CBE
effects on modern conceptions
effects
effects on modern conceptions of identity
In Scramble
"I wanted to represent these European leaders as mindless in their hunger for what the Belgian King Leopold II called a slice of this magnificent African cake"
for africa
"When I was making it I was really thinking about American imperialism and the need in the West for resources such as oil and how this pre-empts the annexation of different parts of the world."
By exploring colonialism, particularly in this tableaux piece, the purpose of the headless figurines implies the loss of humanity as Shonibare explains:
In 2003, Shonibare reconstructs
Conference of 1884–1885
The berlin
costumes
The Last Supper, 2013
Thomas Gainsborough
Jean-Honoré Fragonard,
instead
Yinka Shonibare
The Swing, 2021
Mr and Mrs Andrews, 1750
Yinka Shonibare
Mr.and Mrs. Andrews without their Heads, 1998
Leonardo da Vinci
The Last Supper, 1495-8
Yinka Shonibare
The Swing, 1767
The sleep of reason produces monsters, 1799
The Skating Minister, 17901
Francisco de Goya
Reverend on Ice, 2005
Yinka Shonibare
Fake Death Picture, 2011
Yinka Shonibare
Suicide, 1877–1881
Edouard Manet
famous
recreates
he
Sometimes,
their
original
of
clothing
"Africanised"
with the
dummies
headless
using
paintings
Henry Raeburn
Yinka Shonibare
The sleep of reason produces monsters, 2011
The Last Supper, 2013
Yinka Shonibare
recreates
he
Sometimes,
dummies
headless
costumes
using
paintings
famous
original
their
of
clothing
instead
"Africanised"
with the
The Last Supper, 2013
Thomas Gainsborough
Jean-Honoré Fragonard,
Yinka Shonibare
The Swing, 2021
Mr and Mrs Andrews, 1750
Yinka Shonibare
Mr.and Mrs. Andrews without their Heads, 1998
Leonardo da Vinci
The Last Supper, 1495-8
Yinka Shonibare
The Swing, 1767
The sleep of reason produces monsters, 1799
The Skating Minister, 1790
Francisco de Goya
Reverend on Ice, 2005
Yinka Shonibare
Fake Death Picture, 2011
Yinka Shonibare
Suicide, 1877–1881
Edouard Manet
Henry Raeburn
The sleep of reason produces monsters, 2011
Yinka Shonibare
A globe replaces the figure’s head, depicting an astrological map but with the names of these song birds replacing the names of the constellations.
Shonibare also explores ideas of colonialism and post-colonialism in this work. In this way, the bird catcher can be viewed as the coloniser on a failed civilising mission, whilst the fleeing birds symbolise the colonies that have broken free and become independent, despite attempts to shackle them.
the bird
dilemma
Catcher's
Shonibare’s sculpture presents Papageno performing the impossible task of trapping nature, as all of his birds are escaping from their cages.
nspired by the story of Papageno, the bird catcher, in Mozart’s opera
to coincide with the 100th
the 100th
to coincide
nspired by the story of Papageno, the bird catcher, in Mozart’s opera "the Magic Flute" this sculpture was commissioned for Salzburg Museum to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Salzburg Festival of music and drama
Festival of music and drama
nspired by the story of Papageno, the bird catcher,
Inspired by the story of Papageno, the bird
for Salzburg Museum
Museum
in Mozart’s opera
"the Magic Flute"
catcher,
anniversary of the Salzburg
was commissioned
for Salzburg
this sculpture
globes and
astronauts
helmets of
Each faceless figure is in the midst of an action, presented shooting a mass of cherry blossoms from a rifle, lumbering forward with a hefty mesh sack, or balancing a towering stack of cakes.
movement in the form of travel
form the heads
form the
of the figures
figures
while obscuring individual identities
movement
simultaneously gestures toward movement in the form of travel and exploration while obscuring individual identities
simultaneously gestures toward
heads
of the
in the form of travel
and exploration
Shonibare’s gods are upset that traditional order of the world has been turned upside down and that the transcendent truths, on which the history of mankind is based, are disappearing..
EXHIBITIONs
The Greek gods Apollo, Zeus and Poseidon are depicted as ballerinas. These iconically male figures have been transformed into emblems of female grace, with detailed tutus.
ballerina sculptures
Rage of the Ballet Gods,
Ballerina with violin (Giselle)
Ballet God (Apollo)
Ballet God (Poseidon)
Ballerina with violin (Swan lake)
Ballet God (Zeus)
Globe Head (Ballerina)
current geo-political and social condition
changing state
the
for
in the face
survival
worldwide
historical events as metaphors
current geo-political
geo-political
and social condition
explore
current
The artist is well known for his employment of historical events as metaphors with which to explore current geo-political
and social condition
with which to
human instinct
and the
Earth’s climate
of the
Shonibare
contemplates
extreme
of the
weather
experienced
The artist is well known for his